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5/3/2018 » 5/4/2018
Rocky Mountain Green 2018 Conference

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Brown Bag Series: FOUR MILE FIRE REBUILDS: Greening after the Black
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Brown Bag Series: FOUR MILE FIRE REBUILDS: Greening after the Black

CEU's for this course: 1 hour LU|HSW|SD from AIA Rebuilding Green in the Canyon Case Studies: More than a year after the 6,000-acre Fourmile Fire destroyed 169 homes west of Boulder, some are beginning to rebuild. Join the Guild as we explore 3 unique building processes all focused on sustainability as well as fire mitigation.

3/13/2012
When: second Tuesday of each month
Noon - 1:30 pm
Where: REI Community Room
1789 28th St
Boulder, CO  80302
United States
Contact: Colorado Green Building Guild


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CEU's for this course:
1 hour  LU|HSW|SD from AIA          

Rebuilding Green in the Canyon Case Studies:
More than a year after the 6,000-acre Fourmile Fire destroyed 169 homes west of Boulder, some are beginning to rebuild. Join the Guild as we explore 3 unique building processes all focused on sustainability as well as fire mitigation.


The Howze –Ryan Mountain Home, designed by Henry Mueller Design, Inc., was designed to utilize conventional building materials to create a Net-Zero residence. The super insulated shell incorporates a 2x4 staggered stud configuration developed by NREL in their Habitat for Humanity affordable Net-Zero house design. The building also incorporates PV and solar thermal systems along with passive solar design strategies to create a cozy mountain home.

Brian Fuentes will present  to us 2 different straw bale projects.
     The 1448 Gold Run project is based on using as many local resources as possible for the lowest possible embodied energy footprint.  As building energy use goes to Net Zero with efficiency and renewable power, embodied energy becomes the larger concern for the building's overall carbon footprint.  Local trees from the recent fire are being salvaged for the structural timber frame and all decking, sheathing and other wood required for the project, straw bale walls with local earthen plaster are being used for wall insulation.  Sustainability is also about creating jobs for people, and by salvaging local forest resources rather than having them shipped in, this project aims to displace some cost associated with the shipping of lumber with local and meaningful employment for the building industry.
     At 88 Misty Vale Ct. we explore a prefab straw bale home.  The structure was designed to meet the stringent passive house standard and the straw bale wall panels were built in a shop and then craned into place on site. This allows for straw bale construction year round without risk of the walls being exposed to weather. The project features extreme energy conservation due to a super insulated envelope, very low air leakage, LED lighting, efficient appliances and mechanical equipment, straw bale and heavy timber carbon sequestration and a 6 kW PV system.

How can a house rediscover its physical site and historical context in the wake of a devastating forest fire? For Renée del Gaudio Architecture, the answer was to nestle a compact, low-energy house into a prominent granite outcropping.  Exposed beams, rusted steel, and industrial sized doors draw on the vernacular architecture of Colorado’s mining and barn buildings and make the house fire-resistant. The house is decidedly green, incorporating an open floor plan with cross ventilation, passive solar heating, a 3.5kw solar array, and zero maintenance materials.

Hear directly from the architects and builders involved in these projects.

About our Presenters (more coming soon)

Brian Fuentes with builders Seth Murphy and Matt Buckner 

Henry Mueller

Renee del Gaudio

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